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Children traveling alone
Tickets for children under the age of 14 who are travelling alone are not bookable on this site. In general, minors under the age of 18, traveling alone, may be subject to unaccompanied minor fees as determined by the selected airline. Many airlines provide or require all unaccompanied children to be escorted from point of check-in to the airplane where the child is placed in the care of a flight attendant. This service, called unaccompanied minor service, may result in a fee of $30 or more per flight segment. A parent MUST be present at check-in when a child is traveling alone. Some airlines prohibit children traveling alone from flying on the last connecting flight of the day. Please contact the airline directly to determine what requirements and fees are involved. 

Infant fares
An infant is a child under two years of age not occupying a seat. Once children reach their second birthday, they must be seated in an approved seat. One infant is permitted to travel free on US domestic flights for each passenger paying adult fare who is at least 12 years of age. Each additional child under 2 years of age accompanying the same adult passenger will pay the applicable accompanied child's fare whether they are occupying a seat or not. 

International travel restrictions for children
In an effort to prevent international child abduction, many governments have initiated procedures at entry and exit points, including requiring documentary evidence of relationship and permission of the parent(s) or legal guardian not present for the child's travel. Parents of minor children (under 18 years old) should carefully document legal custody prior to traveling.

Child traveling with one parent
If a minor child is traveling with only one parent, the absent parent should provide notarized consent. If only one parent has legal custody, that parent should be prepared to provide such evidence to airlines and authorities. In cases in which a minor child is traveling alone or in someone else's company, both parents (and the sole, documented custodial parent) should provide notarized consent. If a child traveling has a different last name from the mother and/or father, the parents should be prepared to provide evidence to airlines and authorities, such as a birth certificate or adoption decree, to prove that they are indeed the parents. 

Child travel information for world travel